Remember When You had to Be Published to be a “Writer” ?


Those of us who remember life before blogging, and even the P.C. understand. You could sit up in your room or study writing until the cows came home, but if you didn’t have a book published, or at least some stories in print, you were a wannabe, not really a writer. Your friends and few fans might call you an ‘aspiring writer’, but really, that’s about it. You may even earn the accolade of ‘promising up-and-comer” from your peers, but were you a writer? Of course, as you continued to indeed write, you were a writer. But now, with instant publishing at the click of a computer key, or with self-publishing available over at Amazon, for instance, just about anyone can be ‘published’. You don’t really need talent to be a writer, nor the endless persistence and dogged determination required to break through the innumerable rejection notices to finally make it into the realm of the gods- publication.

I think the process of getting there is what causes great authors to hone their skills and to become amazing, seasoned writers. However, I also wonder if that process stripped some authors of authentic expression. How many authors were forced to change their genres and ‘voice’ to please the market?

Now, we who blog and self-publish have even less chance of getting paid, becoming recognized, or being taken seriously as writers. But, as we know, some break through to fame and fortune through blogging. Some by their writing, but others simply through connecting with a certain niche of society that needs an outlet of expression, and doing it well enough that it becomes a life force of its own. Jimmy Moore comes to mind. The author of livinlavidalow-carb literally saved his life by losing 180 pounds. His success propelled the popularity of his blog. Now, he has several active websites, and last I saw, books, podcasts, special guests, etc.

What is it about the most popular blogs that catapults them into mega-stardom? Why do some very well- written blogs get disregarded? If we look at the number of followers a particular blog has, that can clue us in to who the most popular bloggers are. But, there are so many genres of blogs. The who’s-who in business blogs cannot be compared with the most popular personal or cause oriented blogs.

I’ve also been reading about those claiming they are making big money from their blogging. Can I please have an honest account from anyone who has done this without being involved with some sort of MLM ‘opportunity’?

Finally, there’s just some very fine writing out there that’s not getting enough attention. I find that a sad aspect of blogging. On the other hand, I hope that those who are very skilled writers will find their confidence and begin to submit their work to publications or publishing houses, because I don’t think it’s very likely that they will be ‘discovered’ by various writing talent scouts out there. I am sure it may happen. Has anyone reading ever been contacted with a legitimate writing job because of someone reading their blog? Has anyone gotten a job offer of writing from submitting a sample of their blog writing? Or, are we all just hobbyists?

One thought on “Remember When You had to Be Published to be a “Writer” ?

  1. Thanks for sharing! These are all some really big questions that all bloggers should really consider.

    My aim is simple: to keep in practice. I don’t expect to magically make key connections or be discovered in the blogosphere, though part of me yearns for that (as I’m sure is the case for many).

    If I receive any paid opportunities or business connections, I’ll be sure to post!

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